The Aarhus Convention



Yüklə 11 Kb.
tarix20.04.2016
ölçüsü11 Kb.
The Aarhus Convention

“The active engagement of civil society, both in the formulation of policies and in their implementation, is a prerequisite for meaningful progress towards sustainability.”

--Kofi Annan, former Secretary-General of the United Nations
The United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-Making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters was adopted on 25th June 1998 in the Danish city of Aarhus at the Fourth Ministerial Conference as part of the "Environment for Europe" process. It entered into force on 30 October 2001. The Aarhus Convention establishes a number of rights of the public (individuals and their associations) with regard to the environment. The Parties to the Convention are required to make the necessary provisions so that public authorities (at national, regional or local level) will contribute to these rights to become effective.
The Aarhus Convention, at its core, focuses on interactions between people and their government regarding the environment. Its principles are founded on the idea that sustainable development can be achieved only through the involvement of all stakeholders. What emerged from the convention was a guiding set of policies that both grants the public environmental rights and imposes obligations on authorities regarding environmental information and justice. These principles have been divided into three categories, the pillars of the Aarhus Convention:


  1. Access to Information

  2. Public Participation

  3. Access to Justice


1. Access to information

The first pillar says that the public has the right so seek information from authorities regarding the environment, and that authorities are obligated to comply. Authorities must also collect and disseminate information without necessarily receiving a request.



What does this mean for you?

You, as a Cypriot citizen, have the right to know what is happening in your environment. If a new landfill is being created or a coastline’s wildlife is threatened, the government is obligated to make that information available to you. Under the Aarhus convention, authorities are obliged to provide you with all requested information about your environmental rights as a citizen.


2. Public Participation

The second pillar demands that the public is given the opportunity to participate in decision-making that affects its environment. This may involve development of plans, programs, and policies, as well as participation in preparing laws and rules.


What does this mean for you?

The authorities must provide ways for you to get your voice heard on issues that affect your environment. Cyprus already has laws in place that allow you to submit comments or opinions to the environmental authorities regarding projects with potential impact on the environment. Non-governmental organizations, are allowed to debate with authorities the approval of these projects and environmental legislation.




3. Access to Justice

The third and final pillar enforces the other two pillars in a domestic legal system. It provides a mechanism for the public to directly enforce environmental laws.



What does this mean for you?

Cyprus has not yet passed legislation that conforms to this key third pillar of the Aarhus Convention. But, if you exercise your right to participate in environmental legislation (the second pillar), you can help your country conform to the principles of the Aarhus convention.


The Aarhus Convention combines human rights with environmental rights. It establishes a direct link between freedom of information and the health of your environment. By exercising these rights laid out by the Aarhus Convention, you can help Cyprus become a greener, cleaner country.

This information flyer has been developed within the framework of the project “RECYCLING ON CYCLES”. The project aims in promoting the Aarhus Convention principles and the vision of UN Global Compact within Cypriot Civil Society, by focusing on the thematic area of “Cooperation on solid waste management, including recycling”. AKTI Project and Research Centre is the coordinator of the projects and the partners are Posidonion Cultural and Information Centre, the Culture Institute of the Morphou Bishopric, The KENTHEA Social Club of Cyprus Collage and the Biologists Association.
Our e- Help Desk on issues related to recycling and civil society is available akti@akti.org.cy .
The project is funded by Action for Cooperation and Trust



Yüklə 11 Kb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©www.azrefs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

gir | qeydiyyatdan keç
    Ana səhifə


yükləyin